Related posts tagged with Advanced Manufacturing

Advanced Manufacturing

Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana President Sue Ellspermann Joins Conexus Indiana Board of Directors

Posted by

Dr. Sue Ellspermann, president of Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, is the newest member of the board of directors of Conexus Indiana, the state’s advanced manufacturing and logistics initiative. Steven Dwyer, president and CEO of Conexus Indiana, announced Ellspermann’s appointment today, noting that she brings significant higher education, economic development and high-tech industry experience to the board.

“Dr. Ellspermann brings more than 30 years of experience and public service to our board,” Dwyer said. “Having the president of Ivy Tech Community College serve on our board is invaluable given the important role community college plays in today’s and tomorrow’s workforce. In addition to her significant higher education success, Sue led many initiatives to strengthen Indiana’s advantage as the ‘Crossroads of America ’while serving as Indiana’s 50th Lieutenant Governor.”

During her tenure with the State of Indiana, Ellspermann served with Conexus Indiana board member Catherine A. Langham, president and owner of Langham Logistics, Inc., as co-chair of Governor Mike Pence’s Blue Ribbon Panel on Transportation Infrastructure, and led trade missions to Japan, South Korea Taiwan and China. She also served as president of the Senate and Secretary of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, and oversaw six agencies including the Office of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Office of Tourism, Department of Agriculture, Housing and Community Development Authority, Office of Community and Rural Affairs, and Office of Defense Development.

Prior to her term as lieutenant governor, Ellspermann was founding director of the Center of Applied Research and Economic Development at the University of Southern Indiana (USI) and taught at USI, the University of Evansville and University of Louisville.

“Dr. Ellspermann’s extensive workforce development efforts will be a distinct asset for our board,” said Conexus Indiana Board Chair Chip Edgington, executive vice president of Operations at FULLBEAUTY Brands. “Among other leadership positions, Dr. Ellspermann served while she was Lt. Governor as vice chair of the Indiana Career Council, an organization charged with aligning Indiana’s education and workforce development system to meet employer needs. The Council’s charge is similar to the work Conexus Indiana has been promoting to meet advanced manufacturing and logistics workforce needs. Her expertise and commitment to developing a ready talent base is invaluable.”

“It is an honor to have been invited to join the Conexus Indiana board,” Ellspermann said. “Preparing the next generation of Hoosier workers to achieve career success is vital to the economic future of our state, as well as quality of life for all Indiana residents. I look forward to working with the dedicated members of the Conexus board of directors and staff.”

Ellspermann is closely engaged with other community and private sector organizations, including serving on the OneAmerica board of directors, Indiana honorary chair of the Million Women Mentors, the Central Indiana Corporate Partnership (CICP) board of directors and the advisory board of the Indiana Conference for Women.

Ellspermann earned Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in industrial engineering from the University of Louisville.

link
e-mail

Conexus Indiana Launches Conexus Icon

Posted by

Next Generation Supplier Database Connects Hoosier-based Suppliers with Local and Global Procurement Opportunities

Conexus Indiana announced the launch of Conexus Icon (www.conexusicon.com), a fully optimized supplier database connecting more than 6,000 Hoosier-based original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), state agencies, universities, and small- to medium-sized businesses with procurement opportunities.

The free database simplifies matchmaking, and connects Indiana suppliers with buyers from throughout the state and from around the world through its robust search capabilities and GIS mapping tool that pinpoints company locations and industry clusters.

“The benefits of this new database are enormous,” said Rich Murphy, program manager for Conexus Indiana. “Global buyers have a window into the world of Hoosier suppliers through this database, providing untapped opportunities for business growth and development. In comparison to supplier databases in other states, Conexus Icon sets a new standard and further differentiates Indiana’s business environment.”

Conexus Icon replaces Indiana Supplier INsight, a supplier database that was launched six years ago and grew 500 percent through 2015. The additional functionality provided by Conexus Icon takes the database to the next level, providing search capabilities by keyword, industry sector, business type, and quality and diversity certifications. Companies can post procurement opportunities, and businesses that match the requirements will receive notifications.

Conexus Icon is possible through the Indiana Office of Defense Development (IODD) and a Federal grant intended to assist businesses and communities that are impacted by reductions in DOD spending. Additional support is provided by the Indiana Economic Development Corporation and Ivy Tech Community College, two organizations that also helped launch and provided continued support for Supplier INsight.

“The IODD is excited to be a strategic partner in the development of this new Hoosier-based supplier database,” said Duane Embree, executive director of the IODD. “This new tool will allow us to quickly identify defense-related companies in Indiana and assist with business development efforts.”

In addition to its matchmaking functionality, Conexus Icon gives users access to a community forum for topics including federal contracting, teaming interests and general business topics. It also includes a suggestion box for database improvements.

“Indiana has added 32,000 manufacturing jobs in just the last three years and now employs one in five Hoosiers,” said Victor Smith, Indiana Secretary of Commerce. “Advanced manufacturing is driving economic growth in Indiana, and it’s crucial that momentum continues. Paired with our business-friendly climate, Conexus Icon will be a key asset in helping to attract and grow manufacturing in the state.”

To view the database, go to www.conexusicon.com.

###





 

link
e-mail

New Data: Indiana Ranks as National Leader in Share of Advanced Manufacturing Employment

Posted by

Indiana has the largest state share of advanced manufacturing employment in the nation, with one out of every 12 workers employed in the advanced manufacturing sector, according a data released today by the Ball State Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) and Conexus Indiana. The data confirms that Indiana not only has the largest concentration of manufacturing in the nation, but also leads with nearly 53 percent of its manufacturing employment in companies deemed advanced manufacturing.

Advanced manufacturing is defined by the Brookings Institution as an industry sector with high levels of STEM-related occupations and research and development investment. Using Brookings Institution’s definition, CBER looked at each state’s advanced manufacturing employment as a share of total manufacturing employment in 2013.

Conexus and CBER data also shows that Indiana’s advanced manufacturing share is growing. Between 2010 and 2013, Indiana experienced a 1.8 percentage point growth in advanced manufacturing employment, placing it in the top 25 percent nationally.

Education is an important driver of advanced manufacturing growth; researchers identified a strong correlation between educational attainment and advanced manufacturing growth in Indiana. From 2010 through 2013, the growth in the number of Indiana adults with Associate degrees or higher was positively related to growth in the advanced manufacturing sector, indicating that a well-educated and ready workforce matters more than any other single factor in the health of advanced manufacturing firms.

Additional data shows that nationally STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) and white-collar jobs are growing in the advanced manufacturing sector, while blue-collar occupations have declined. Of Indiana’s 243,597 advanced manufacturing jobs, 17.4 percent are STEM-related, 24.7 percent are white-collar and 57.8 percent are blue-collar.

“These data underscore the importance of talent development efforts with a focus on educational attainment,” said Michael Hicks, Ph.D., director of CBER. “Programs such as Hire Tech, where students are exposed early on to the concepts of advanced manufacturing, are needed now more than ever as Indiana continues to grow its advanced manufacturing industry. Transitioning students into potential employees is urgent, given the fact that advanced manufacturing growth has likely provided a bulk of manufacturing employment growth in Indiana over the past decade.”

“With a direct correlation between educational attainment and the health of our advanced manufacturing sector, it’s vitally important that we focus the right resources on preparing talent to succeed in the advanced manufacturing sector,” added Steven Dwyer, president and CEO of Conexus Indiana. “While the State of Indiana has many programs in place to address this talent need, we need to continue our focus on attainment, which today ranks no better than average for advanced manufacturing skills.”

In the accompanying study 2016 Manufacturing & Logistics Report Card for Indiana, CBER reports that Indiana maintained its “A” grade in Manufacturing Health, with 2015 again being a record year for manufacturing production. Indiana maintained its grade levels in seven of the nine categories from 2015 to 2016. Indiana’s grade for Logistics dropped from an “A” grade in 2015 to an “A-”, which was caused, in part, by the absence of a long-term infrastructure funding solution.  Indiana’s grade in Productivity and Innovation increased from a B- in 2015 to a B+ in 2016.

The nine categories in the national report card are those considered most likely to be among the issues site selection experts for manufacturing and logistics firms scrutinize.

Other grades for Indiana include:

Human Capital: C

Worker Benefit Costs: D+

Tax Climate: A

Expected Fiscal Liability Gap: B-

Global Reach: A

Sector Diversification: C

Indiana, compared to its midwestern neighbors, ranks high in Manufacturing Industry Health, Tax Climate, Fiscal Liability Gap, and Productivity and Innovation and Logistics. Indiana lags neighboring states in Worker Benefit Costs, which is caused by health care expenditures through relative higher premiums.

Full Reports:

The full Indiana report, national report, and Advanced Manufacturing in the United States: The Shift Toward Diversified Industries and an Educated Workforce are available at www.conexus.cberdata.org.

About Conexus Indiana

Conexus is the state’s advanced manufacturing and logistics initiative, dedicated to making Indiana a global leader. Conexus is focused on strategic priorities such as workforce development, creating new industry partnerships, and promoting Indiana’s advantages in manufacturing and logistics. Learn more at www.ConexusIndiana.com.

About Ball State Center for Business and Economic Research

The Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) is an economic policy and forecasting research center at Ball State University. CBER research includes public finance, regional economics, manufacturing, transportation, and energy sector studies. The Center produces the CBER Data Center – a suite of web-based data tools – and the Indiana Business Bulletin – a weekly newsletter with commentary on current issues and regularly updated data on dozens of economic indicators. In addition to research and data delivery, CBER serves as a business forecasting authority in Indiana’s east-central region, holding the annual Indiana Economic Outlook luncheon and quarterly meetings of the Ball State University Business Roundtable. The 2016 Manufacturing and Logistics Report Card for Indiana, 2016 Manufacturing and Logistics Report Card for the United States and Advanced Manufacturing in the United States: The Shift Toward Diversified Industries and an Educated Workforce were written by Michael Hicks, Ph.D., George and Frances Ball distinguished professor of Economics, Miller College of Business, and Srikant Devaraj, Ph.D., research assistant professor with CBER.

link
e-mail

Chip Edgington Named Chairman of the Conexus Indiana Board of Directors

Posted by

Conexus Indiana CEO Steven Dwyer announced today that Chip Edgington, executive vice president of Operations for FULLBEAUTY Brands, has been named chairman of the Conexus Indiana Board of Directors. Edgington succeeds David Parish who served as Conexus board chairman for three years and recently retired from Allison Transmission as senior vice president, Operations and Purchasing.

“Chip and David have both been long-time advocates of the Conexus Indiana mission as board members and as global industry leaders, and they have committed generous time and talent to shaping and delivering important Conexus programs for students, Indiana businesses and the community,” said Dwyer. “David brought a great deal of energy to the board and helped advance many Conexus Indiana programs that are building the next generation of advanced manufacturing and logistics workers and creating opportunities for Indiana’s continued leadership as the ‘Crossroads of America.’”

Edgington has been a member of the Conexus Indiana board of directors since 2012. He has chaired the Conexus Indiana Logistics Council since 2011, and was instrumental in 2015 in creating and launching six regional logistics plans that outlined infrastructure, public policy and education needs in each of Indiana’s 92 counties. He also led the development and implementation of logistics events at Indiana colleges to encourage students to consider logistics careers and network with Indiana executives to learn about internship and job opportunities.

“Chip has brought a lot of great ideas to Conexus and has personally invested significant time making sure we have the best programs and resources to reach students of all grade levels,” Dwyer said. “He displays his passion for Conexus, its programs and for the advanced manufacturing and logistics industry in everything he does.”

In addition to his work with Conexus Indiana, Edgington serves on the board of directors for the Central Indiana Corporate Partnership (CICP), a coalition of Indiana executives and university presidents focused on long-term growth and prosperity for the state through initiatives based on manufacturing, life science, logistics, energy and information technology. He is heavily engaged with early childhood development in central Indiana and has led numerous initiatives within FULLBEAUTY Brands to support inner city preschools from weekly reading programs to renovation projects to the company’s annual fund raiser.

 

About FULLBEAUTY Brands

FULLBEAUTY Brands is the most trusted, comprehensive resource for curvy women and big and tall men seeking fashion inspiration, style advice and clothing tailored to their individual needs.

About Conexus Indiana:

Conexus Indiana is the state’s advanced manufacturing and logistics initiative, dedicated to making Indiana a global leader. Conexus Indiana is focused on strategic priorities like workforce development, creating new industry partnerships and promoting Indiana’s advantages in manufacturing and logistics. Learn more at www.ConexusIndiana.com.

link
e-mail

Conexus Indiana Adds New Board Member

Posted by

Conexus Indiana CEO Steven Dwyer announced today that Michael A. Dick, senior vice president, Operations and Purchasing at Allison Transmission, has been named a member of the Conexus Indiana board of directors.

“We are excited Mike is joining our board and welcome his expertise in leveraging the advanced manufacturing and logistics strengths of our state,” said Dwyer. “Allison Transmission has been a long-time, valuable partner in Conexus Indiana’s work to move Indiana forward, and Mike’s appointment builds on that commitment.”

Dick joined Allison Transmission in 2006 and was named vice president of Purchasing, Supplier Quality and Manufacturing Engineering in 2012. Previously, he was executive director of operations and plant manager for the 1000/2000 Series manufacturing plant in Indianapolis and executive director of the Manufacturing Engineering team, which was responsible for the successful launch of the Chennai, India, Phase II assembly plant and the relocation of the 3000/4000 Series assembly operations in Szentgotthard, Hungary.

Before joining Allison Transmission, Dick worked for the New Venture Gear Corporation – a joint venture for General Motors and Chrysler – where he served as the vice president and division manager.  He holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering technology from Purdue University.

About Conexus Indiana:

Conexus Indiana is the state’s advanced manufacturing and logistics initiative, dedicated to making Indiana a global leader. Conexus Indiana is focused on strategic priorities like workforce development, creating new industry partnerships and promoting Indiana’s advantages in manufacturing and logistics. Learn more at www.ConexusIndiana.com.

link
e-mail

Indiana Retains A-Level Performance in Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics – And Why That Matters

Posted by

The 2015 Manufacturing and Logistics Report Card issued by Conexus Indiana, the state’s advanced manufacturing and logistics initiative, and Ball State University’s Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), places Indiana among the nation’s elite in four important categories: manufacturing health, logistics health, tax climate and global reach. A companion study, The Myth and the Reality of Manufacturing in America, explains why that bodes well for Hoosier workers and the Indiana economy.

“There are major misunderstandings among the public and the media about the manufacturing sector,” said Michael J. Hicks, PhD, director of CBER and an economics professor at Ball State. “The U.S. manufacturing base is not in decline, and we have recovered from the recession. Nor are jobs being outsourced because American manufacturing can’t compete internationally.  Moreover new jobs in manufacturing pay well above the average wage.”

Manufacturing, The Myth and the Reality explains, is a large, resilient and growing sector of the U.S. economy, and production remains robust. And, as the 2015 Manufacturing and Logistics Report Card makes clear, both industries continue to flourish in Indiana, leading the state’s growing economy in the post-Great Recession era.

The study clarifies that national manufacturing production in the U.S. has seen long-term growth since before the Great Depression.  And the Great Recession – painful as it was – had completely lost its stranglehold by 2014, when U.S. manufacturers attained record levels of production. The report also demonstrates that one of the most important changes in the past decade has been the impact of an 87% increase in employee productivity, which has resulted in enormous changes to today’s workforce – both in the employment levels and in the skills needed to succeed in a changing environment.

“Overall, only 13 percent of lost jobs over the past decade, which are less than 4 percent of all manufacturing jobs, can be linked to international trade,” Hicks said, “and most of trade-related job losses are in low productivity sectors.

“Changes in productivity, domestic demand and foreign trade all impact manufacturing employment in the U.S., and it’s important to clarify those impacts in order to understand what is happening in the manufacturing and logistics industries,” Hicks continued.

For the seventh consecutive year, Indiana’s manufacturing health has earned an ‘A’, and for five consecutive years, the state has rated an ‘A’ in logistics health. Both Indiana’s global reach and its tax climate maintained ‘A’ grades for the seventh consecutive year. All four categories are key components for businesses seeking to relocate or expand.

“Indiana benefits from business operations and employment in a diverse range of sectors, from biosciences to communications,” said Steven Dwyer, president and CEO of Conexus Indiana. “The data convincingly demonstrate our competitive edge, both in the Midwest and nationally.

“Conexus Indiana, Ivy Tech Community College, along with our industry and education partners recognize that the workforce component is an essential piece of Indiana’s continued success in advanced manufacturing and logistics,” he continued. “Our innovative programming at the high school and post-secondary levels are achieving positive results teaching the middle skills necessary to succeed in advanced manufacturing careers.”

Graduates are already emerging from these targeted programs armed with industry-recognized credentials that enable them to move directly into skilled positions with some of the state’s most sought-after employers in automotives, aerospace, biosciences, pharmaceuticals and other high-tech sectors.

That’s good news, since baby boom generation retirees are leaving behind good, well-paying jobs in those sectors, and younger workers are filling those jobs at an unprecedented rate. Recent new hire salaries averaged $20.06 per hour – almost $42,000 a year. As millennials move into the workforce, wage gaps between new and existing jobs are primarily age- and tenure-related.

“The Myth and the Reality points out that sustainable manufacturing employment growth requires high levels of human capital with the appropriate educational skills,” said Dwyer. “Our programs such as Hire Tech are preparing students by focusing on the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) skills that are needed in the advanced manufacturing environment. Indiana’s second year of improvement (‘C-‘ to ‘C’) in the Human Capital category indicates that those initiatives in workforce development are the right approach to growing a job-ready talent pool required by Indiana’s booming advanced manufacturing and logistics companies.”

The nine categories in the national report card are those considered most likely to be among the issues site selection experts for manufacturing and logistics firms scrutinize, and Indiana maintained or improved its scores in all but one. Worker benefit costs are slightly lower and remain higher than the national average. Both benefits and human capital categories are likely topics for debate and policy development in the next General Assembly.

Indiana’s scores in both Expected Fiscal Gap and Productivity & Innovation continued their three-year improvement, with slightly better than average ‘B-‘ grades in each. Still, the state outscored its Midwest neighbors Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin in the fiscal category, and only Michigan managed to reach the ‘A’ category in Productivity & Innovation.

“We are proud that Indiana continues to lead the Midwest and most of the nation in the 21st century manufacturing and logistics sectors,” Dwyer said. “Conexus Indiana’s vision of Indiana as the recognized global leader in advanced manufacturing and logistics grows closer each year, as we catalyze the efforts of industry partners and promote better understanding of these sectors to the state’s economic future.”

Full Reports:

The full Indiana report, national report, and the companion study, The Myth and the Reality of Manufacturing in America, are available at www.conexus.cberdata.org.

About Conexus Indiana

Conexus is the state’s advanced manufacturing and logistics initiative, dedicated to making Indiana a global leader. Conexus is focused on strategic priorities such as workforce development, creating new industry partnerships, and promoting Indiana’s advantages in manufacturing and logistics. Learn more at www.ConexusIndiana.com.

About Ball State Center for Business and Economic Research

The Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) is an economic policy and forecasting research center at Ball State University. CBER research includes public finance, regional economics, manufacturing, transportation, and energy sector studies. The Center produces the CBER Data Center – a suite of web-based data tools – and the Indiana Business Bulletin – a weekly newsletter with commentary on current issues and regularly updated data on dozens of economic indicators. In addition to research and data delivery, CBER serves as a business forecasting authority in Indiana’s east-central region, holding the annual Indiana Economic Outlook luncheon and quarterly meetings of the Ball State University Business Roundtable.

link
e-mail

Annual survey finds Hoosier manufacturers confident, poised for growth

Posted by

Katz, Sapper & Miller released its annual survey of Indiana manufacturers today, authored by faculty from the IU Kelley School of Business at Indianapolis and developed in partnership with Conexus Indiana and the Indiana Manufacturers Association. Indiana is the most manufacturing-dependent state in the nation, and the industry continues a strong rebound from the Great Recession; however, the survey warns that growth could be derailed by regulatory costs and workforce weaknesses. Download the report

link
e-mail

Northwest Indiana Tackles 'Skills Gap'

Posted by

Inside INdiana Business

December 11, 2012

News Release

Employer engagement may be the secret sauce that helps high schools equip students with the skills sought by companies.

A new program at George Rogers Clark high school in Hammond, Indiana and ongoing programs at the Porter County Career and Technical Center in Valparaiso, welcome employers to advise classroom teachers and the curriculum they deliver to students.

The “skills gap” was the subject of a recent article in The Wall Street Journal showcasing Fort Wayne, Indiana employers talking about their skill needs and the skills applicants possess.

Employer advisory committees are a critical element of his school, says Jon Groth, the principal at the Valparaiso-based Career Center. Employers are encouraged to review curriculum and to point out inconsistencies in what is taught and what they need in order to deliver a service or manufacture a product.

In several areas, the school goal is to find jobs before seniors graduate. The Career Center has a strong placement record especially in its Modern Machining Technology program. Graduates of the program have been known to step into jobs paying as much as $40,000 a year. Task Force Tips, a Valparaiso company that produces fire hose nozzles, has been hiring three to four Career Center graduates every year. Another local company—Urschel Labs, a manufacturer of commercial food slicing machines—also recruits and hires Career Center grads.

Principal Groth contends such hires would not occur if the skills taught in school were not aligned to the needs of business.

The Valparaiso Redevelopment Commission expressed its vote of confidence in the Career Center by awarding it a $40,000 grant. The money allowed the school to buy a state of the art CNC machine that is a four axis, numerically controlled, multi-tool lathe/mill manufacturing center. The machine is commonly found in metal fabricating and machining factories in northwest Indiana.

The school also prides itself with the employer relationships it has with new car dealerships and auto repair shops, hospitals, medical offices and nursing homes.

Groth says more than 70% of students attending the Career Center are college-bound. However, he also knows other families are concerned with the return on investment of a four year college degree, and believe the Career Center has had great success with many students leaving the Career Center and into a decent paying job.

In Hammond, a new program at Clark High school is connecting 86 sophomores and juniors with two key Indiana sectors, advanced manufacturing and logistics. A state organization—Conexus Indiana—facilitated the linkage through its program called Hire Technology. Clark is one of eight Indiana high schools involved in the program. The goal is to align student learning with the skills and work ethic sought by manufacturing and logistics companies. Those sectors are cited for high job growth in Indiana.

The students are taking advantage of online learning and accessing manufacturing production classes from Ivy Tech. Jim Bryant is the teacher that oversees the 30-station computer lab at Clark. Bryant, who served 21 years with the Marines, says students who successfully complete the two-year program will earn nine hours of college credits and five industry recognized certifications.

Bryant’s goal is to make learning relevant. He is now working with Lear to have his students visit the Hammond facility that manufactures seats for Ford Motors. That visit may help students, said Bryant, to link their work in the classroom to the factory floor.

Source: Center for Workforce Innovations




 

link
e-mail

Hammond School Piloting Hire Technology

Posted by

http://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/lake/hammond/school-pilots-logistics-manufacturing-program/article_5ec93b9e-9542-5925-b059-3e79fd8f9ba3.html


 

link
e-mail

UPS Donates $50,000 to Conexus Indiana

Posted by

http://www.wibc.com/news/Story.aspx?ID=1788876


 

link
e-mail